A review of Shadows Fall (Michaela & Trisha #2) , by Kate Genet

READ MARCH 2012

ONLINE PLOT SUMMARY: “Separated by circumstances, Michaela and Trisha are both too stubborn to admit they miss each other. Even Trisha’s impulsive phone call for help degenerates into an argument. But why does Trisha need help? Swallowing her pride, Michaela decides she needs to fly back to the States to see what trouble Trisha has gotten herself into this time.

She’s glad she did. This time it’s not a stranger in trouble, it’s Trisha’s sister, and the trouble is a lot darker that any of them can imagine. This time, the night is filled with shadows, and some of them move on their own…”

MY PLOT SUMMARY: Lovers Michaela and Trisha have parted ways after the first novel, out of necessity, though they miss each other more than either wants to admit. Trisha summons Michaela to the US to help solve a mystery involving her (Trisha’s) sister, Caro. Seems some very malevolent shadow creatures are “haunting” Caro, and Trisha believes Michaela is the only one who can help. Along the way of unraveling the mystery, and vanquishing the shamanistic spirits, our two principals finally admit their love for each other, and come up with a plan to allow them (and Caro) to remain together.

MY REVIEW: I have no idea why, when I added this book on another forum, I only gave it 3 stars; I’d given it 4 on amazon when I first read it. The only negative, as I just reread that review, I called a “gigantic flaw,” but, having had time to reconsider, I realize it was really more of an annoyance. It was just more noticeable because, otherwise, the book was so damned good. Were I using a star system, here, 4 1/2 stars is probably more accurate.

Possible slight SPOILERS!!! follow (Some of the comments below could be applied equally well to the first book in the series Silent Light.)

The story is very well-written from a technical standpoint; grammar, syntax, etc. are much better than in the average offering in this indie Kindle medium, and especially at this price point, for which, many thanks. Okay, at one point, Trisha becomes “Tricia”, then returns to being Trisha again in the same paragraph, and, yeah, that’s pretty sloppy, but, again, it stands out because of the marked lack of other such errors. The paranormal aspect of the story is deftly handled, and logically concluded. The pacing of the romance is just right. The love-making is realistic without being xxx-rated. Genet skillfully creates an eerie, almost claustrophobic mood which becomes more and more oppressive as the story progresses. I absolutely love these characters, just as I did in the first novel, and Caro is a very nice addition. Michaela and Trisha’s characters complement each other nicely, and they act in ways that are consistent with their established dispositions.

So, what’s that “gigantic flaw” I mentioned earlier? I can’t imagine a reader from the US who would  believe that Trisha and Caro are from the States. If Genet is aiming only at an audience in NZ or OZ, then that’s no big deal: if she has wider aspirations, then it becomes more of an issue. We don’t ring people up.. We don’t go off and get ourselves sorted out. We don’t usually “pinch” things, we swipe them. And, while we do on occasion, use the expletive “bloody,” it’s vastly overused here. Finally, assuming Caro is a nickname, it, too, has a real “Down Under” feel to it.

That said, this is a still great story, very well-executed for the most part, and,  to repeat, it features characters with whom I immediately fell in love in book one and who are equally engaging here. Caro makes a really nice addition, too.

Let me end by streesing that my original comments about Tricia and Caro’s dialog were something of an overreaction on my part, and you should take them with a grain of salt. yeah, they’re aggravating, but, they don’t detract all that much from the reading enjoyment. This issue is very much improved in the succeeding volumes, Sweet Charlotte and Disbelief.

s every

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